Have any questions? Feel free to contact us:
D-Doc/Out of Hours GP: 1850 22 44 77
185 New Cabra Road, Dublin 7, D07 FR52

Contraception, Family Planning & Fertility

We offer a wide range of contraceptive options. Different contraceptive options offer different advantages in terms of rate of effectiveness, duration etc. The Doctor will discuss the available options with you during a consultation and help you choose the best option for you, taking account of different factors including your medical history, lifestyle and contraceptive preferences.

Combined oral contraceptive pills

Combined oral contraceptive pills usually combine two female hormones (oestrogen and progesterone), which prevent a woman from ovulating each month. The pill must be taken every day for a set number of days. The pill must be taken every day for a set number of days.

Emergency contraception (the ‘morning after pill’) can be taken up to 3-5 days after unprotected intercourse but is most effective within 24 hours.

Implants (such as Implanon)

… is a small rod which is placed under the skin, usually on the inside of the upper arm. It can be felt under the skin but is not visible. It contains progesterone which is slowly released to stop ovulation. It lasts for approximately 3 years.

Barrier methods (condoms, diaphragm etc.)

… is a small rod which is placed under the skin, usually on the inside of the upper arm. It can be felt under the skin but is not visible. It contains progesterone which is slowly released to stop ovulation. It lasts for approximately 3 years.

Intra-uterine devices IUD’s (copper coils, Mirena, Jaydess etc.)

… these are devices that are placed into the intra-uterine system and prevent conception by preventing the sperm from getting to the egg, or by preventing the egg from getting to or settling in the womb. These devices can last from 5 to 7 years depending on the type and other factors.

Contraceptive patch (e.g. Evra)

… is similar to a clear plaster and is worn on the skin to release hormones (oestrogen and progesterone) to prevent ovulation. A patch is worn every week for three weeks in a woman’s cycle, followed by a one-week break.

Vaginal contraceptive ring (e.g Nuvaring)

… is inserted into the vagina to release hormones (oestrogen and progesterone) which prevent ovulation. The ring is inserted by the woman for three weeks in every month. It is not noticeable during intercourse.

Contraceptive injections

These usually contain progesterone hormone only. They last approximately 12 weeks.

Referral to a specialist for male and female sterilisation

Sterilisation requires a surgical procedure to provide permanent contraception. For male sterilisation (vasectomy), the tubes which carry sperm are cut. For female sterilisation (tubal ligation), the fallopian tubes which carry the eggs are clipped.